Native Gardeners’ Corner—Members’ Tips, Tricks, and Techniques

This column is a regular newsletter feature offering chapter members and local experts a chance to briefly share information on many things related to gardening with natives. The question for this newsletter is: What is the best garden-related gift you have ever received?”

Sima Bernstein-“The best gift was a banner with the following: GARDENING IS THE SLOWEST OF THE PERFORMING ARTS.”

Jackie Brodsky-“For me (74), the best gift ever was "labor". My grandson dug the holes and I planted each plant with TLC. Bazinga!”

Orchid Black-“Best gift ever: a British-made poacher's spade. I never use a bigger shovel anymore. If I were a new gardener, I would want a pair of Felco pruners.”

John Gossett-“Long-sleeved Foxgloves, by far the best gift ever. They allow me to weed, dig, and transplant, and yet feel what I am doing almost as well as if my hands were bare. I wore garden gloves of all sorts for years, but for these tasks they always came off in the first few minutes, leading to hands dry enough to drain a lake. These won’t last a long time, but they work. I use leather gloves for the other garden tasks. I always replace them with red ones to make them easy to find, but then I am expert at misplacing things, so maybe you would like a less blatant color?”

Rama Nayeri-“Cow…[poop]. I have a friend who is a farmer and she takes her cow feces and turns it into manure tea.“

Bob Allen-“Help weeding!“

Terry LePage-“Gift certificates for native plant nurseries!”

Dan Songster-“My favorite “Gift” was the time given to me by plant legends such as John Dourley, Lee Lenz, Mike Evans, Dave Fross, and a young Bart O’Brien in the early days of my relationship with native plants. Even today I am impressed and thankful for the way native plant folks such as Glenn Keator, Lili Singer, Carol Bornstein, Greg Rubin, and Jeff Bohn respond to questions I have. Plant lovers make a wonderful giving community, that is for sure!

Our question for the next newsletter is: “Do you grow any native plants because they are especially entertaining, interesting, or just plain weird?” Email your responses to Dan Songster at . Please remember to keep replies brief so we can include most of the responses!

2018 CNPS Conservation Conference Travel Grant

The Orange County CNPS chapter is offering up to four $250 travel grants to attend the 2018 State CNPS Conference, Feb. 1-3 2018 in Los Angeles.  Graduate and highly qualified undergraduate students training in the study of southern California native plants are eligible. For more information click here.

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