Native Gardener’s Corner-Member’s Tips Tricks, and Techniques

This column offers chapter members a chance to briefly share information on many things related to gardening with natives. The question for this issue was: “Which native gardening blogs or websites do you always make a point to visit and why?”

Laura Camp - Check out the Growing Natives Blog linked on the CNPS main page (cnps.org) under the "Growing Natives" tab. I'm contributing articles, so let me know if you have something to share, and also leave your comments, please!

Bob Allen - Barbara Eisenstein's pages http://www.weedingwildsuburbia.com/ are always informative, fun, and lavishly punctuated with her photographs. Oh, and her blog at:
http://www.wildsuburbia.blogspot.com/  

Brad Jenkins - laspilitas.com has a number of useful sections for figuring out what to grow where. For general research, they have a wonderfully extensive list of plants with notes that are easily accessed by scientific or common name.

Gabi McLean (from up in the San Gabriel Chapter) - I just started my own garden blog; you get to it from our website www.natureathand.com  Also, our chapter newsletter has a native gardening corner column. You can read it  and all the archives on the web at www.cnps-sgm.org

Alan Lindsay - Whether it's gardening or botany, first I get into Calflora. After that I use two of their links for additional information, "Photos" particularly CalPhotos, and the link to "1993 Jepson . . ." Sometimes I use the "Related names:" link to the genus I'm searching for. And, very often I click on a county in the "Distribution" map to see where it was found and by whom. And the link to "Nursery availability" if I plan to add the plant to my garden.

Dori Ito - So many blogs, so little time! A few of my natives favorites are: Emily Green's blog
http://chanceofrain.com/ not strictly native, but great informed writings on water issues, a major argument for native gardening, with helpful links. Deborah Small's http://deborahsmall.wordpress.com/ A
visually scrumptious blog which also has substantive info on the ethnobotanical aspects of native plants. Chuck B's  http://back40feet.blogspot.com/ has a fascinating photo record going back 5 years in archival entries showing the evolution of his (mostly) native yard plus other gardening goings on in the Bay area, with an associated Flickr Photostream.  Closer to home, Barbara Eisenstein's blog (see above) is an all-around entertaining and informative read that's easy to relate to. And another Flickr Photo acct with many, excellent native plant photos is Pete@eastbaywilds , http://www.flickr.com/photos/eastbaywilds/sets The container gardening set is especially nice.

Ron Vanderhoff - You shouldn’t have to ask. I always enjoy the Facebook posts from the “Friends of Golden West College Native Garden”. I learn about new plants, tips about care and maintenance, etc. Not sure who the author is but he must be really smart.... I especially liked the native plant identification quizzes a while ago. (Thanks, Ron—D)

Barbara Eisenstein - There are many excellent native plant gardening blogs out there. CNPS's Grow Natives Blog is relatively new but has some really interesting posts (http://grownatives.cnps.org/). A new blog is Hey Natives http://heynatives.blogspot.com/. And finally Deborah Small's truly beautiful blog on Ethnobotany always inspires me http://deborahsmall.wordpress.com/. There are many more out there and I have listed other favorites on my own native garden blog http://www.wildsuburbia.blogspot.com/

Dan Songster - The first website I got deep into was Las Pilitas Nursery’s. Still excellent! Can’t get by without Calflora, oh, and Tree of Life nursery has good balanced content. For some pleasant reading (with great content as well) Barbara Eisenstein’s pages can’t be beat and http://heynatives.blogspot.com/ is fun. Yes I check out the Golden West College Native Garden Website when I add content, http://www.goldenwestcollege.edu/garden/index.html and the Facebook Page of the Friends of Golden West College Native Garden.

Note: I received several replies stating they did not visit or use any websites or blogs. Books and questioning friends who grow natives is their way of discovering more about natives!

Next Newsletter’s Question: “What is your favorite deciduous native plant, shrub, or tree?”

Email your responses to Dan Songster. and Please remember to keep replies brief so we can include most of the responses!

2018 CNPS Conservation Conference Travel Grant

Congratulations to Marlee Antill, James Bailey, Rebecca Crow, Hailey Laskey, and Wilnelia Ricart, winners of our 2018 CNPS Conservation Conference Student Travel Grant! We look forward to seeing them at the Conference next February. 

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